Trade the Bullish and Bearish Rectangles

Posted on 04th September 2018
Trade the Bullish and Bearish Rectangles

Chart patterns have been the closest ally of day traders. You can easily slither out of a bad trading day with chart patterns for their easy-to-the-eye formation and evident profit margin. One such formation is the rectangle chart pattern. Of course, the price action doesn’t give us a perfect rectangle, but it can be predicted with the cues of the chart. Here is how the pattern works.

Pattern Formation

If the price bounces between a fixed range, the support and the resistance become parallel to each other as a straight horizontal line. Support is the line below which the price finds it hard to slip, and resistance is the line above which the price action struggles to strive. Once they become parallel, they set up the fundamental for the rectangle. The line enclosing the left side is drawn at the starting of the fluctuation bounces, or to put it in simple terms, the line is drawn at the start of the horizontality of the support and resistance line.

Bullish Rectangle

The rectangle formed in the uptrend often indicates a bullish rally. The rectangle is probably because of the traders taking a breath to decide on the side to take, either long or short.

Entry: The right position to enter the trade is by the completion of the formation. A lot number of traders have assumed the formation before the completion only to regret it later. The trade should be taken only when the price action hikes beyond the rectangle limits.

Exit: The safest exit position is marked above the resistance line at the price which is the calculated height between the resistance line and the support line. The price tends to push further than our marked exit, but extending our limit increases the risk of loss as the price can go the other way too.

Bearish Rectangle

Downtrend rectangle formation hints at the bearish price action. The formation tends to dip below the support line leaving an ample opening for profits.

Entry: Just like its bullish counterpart, the trade is to be taken after the completion of the formation. Shorting is the obvious option as it is a bearish rally.

Exit: The calculated difference between the resistance and support is taken into account and marked from the end of the rectangle in the downtrend to determine the safest exit.

Stop Loss: In case, the trade did not go as planned, Stop-Loss comes into play and reduces your losses to the minimum.

One final advice for all the novice venturing out seeking a scintillating career: it matters less how many chart patterns and strategies you learn unless you test it with historical data and live trading emulators which lets you experience the real-time trading situations.

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